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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Sheldon Whitehouse
U.S. Senator, D-Rhode Island
CSPAN 07/31/2013
Cole continued: national security and civil liberties. And what kinds of programs we put into place to gain intelligence information. it is the same kind of debate we need to have about what’s classified and what’s not classified and what secrets we let out. If it was easy, we would be having this left and right. From what I’ve seen, that the executive branch is doing it, to disadvantage the legislative branch. Whitehouse: it does have that effect. Cole: It may have that effect. And I would concede that. Whitehouse: I think it’s done
Sheldon Whitehouse
U.S. Senator, D-Rhode Island
CSPAN 07/31/2013
Whitehouse continued 1A : because people are cautious. And it is easier to over classify than to under classify. It is safer to over classify than to under classify. –and now we’re having to get in and into the hard work of finding just where that line is and that’s a difficult jobs to do but’s it’s worth doing. Whitehouse: ..or something like that happens or the torture program gets exposed or we have a significant cyber attack or something happens
Sheldon Whitehouse
U.S. Senator, D-Rhode Island
CSPAN 07/31/2013
Whitehouse continued 2A: that shows that that short term decision, that it was easier to classify, was actually the wrong decision. Litt: I just want to add on this, and I know you are familiar with what I'm going to say. We are having a public debate now but that public debate is not without cost. The information that has been leaked is going to do damage to our ability to protect the nation. We are going to lose capabilities. People are paying attention to this. The way that typically the Congress, both through the legislation it passes and through its own internal rules, has historically sought to achieve the balance between appropriate oversight of intelligence activities and the need
Sheldon Whitehouse
U.S. Senator, D-Rhode Island
CSPAN 07/31/2013
Whitehouse continued 3A: to protect sources and methods is through, primarily the intelligence committee but also some other committees of Congress, this committee, the armed services committee, the appropriations committees. And Typically, that’s the forum that has been used to strike this balance. It may be Whitehouse: We all get that. My time has expired so let me just jump in and say we all get that My point is, that the American public is an important part of this debate and we would probably be better
Keith Alexander
General, Director of the National Security Agency, Chief of the Central Security Service and Commander of the United States Cyber Command.
MSNBCW 07/31/2013
Video of Black Hat Hackers Convention in Las Vegas: Hayes: Keith Alexander, the head of the NSA, one of the most powerful men in the world, a man who up until now has been content in the shadows, defending himself on video, before a crowd peppered with hecklers. Alexander: our nation takes stopping terrorism as one of the most important things. Audience: freedom. Alexander: exactly. And with that, when you think about it, how do we do that. Because we stand for freedom.
Keith Alexander
General, Director of the National Security Agency, Chief of the Central Security Service and Commander of the United States Cyber Command.
MSNBCW 07/31/2013
Continued: Audience: [ bleep ]. Alexander: not that. But i think what you're saying is that in these cases, what's the decision, where's the discussion, and what tools should we have to stop those? Audience: they’re all saying I don't trust you. Audience: You lied to Congress. Why would we believe you’re not lying to us now? Alexander: I haven’t lied to Congress.
James Cole
Deputy US Attorney General
CSPAN 08/01/2013
I want to make absolutely sure that I understand the scope of 215. First Question. What information does the government collect under this program, and specifically, is anyone's name, address, social security number, or location collected? Cole: Senator Grassley, first, to answer the second part, name, address, location social security number is not collected
Alan Grayson
U.S. Representative D-Florida, Foreign Affairs Committee member
CSPAN 08/01/2013
Video clip of Cole from NSA hearing: Unless you go through the procedures of documenting that, there is reasonable articular of all suspicion that the phone number you want to ask about is associated with terrorists. Host: reaction? Grayson: it is irrelevant. It is misleading as well. Every time you make a phone call, every time i make a phone call, every time your listeners call into this show, the NSA gets a record of that call. That is what people are concerned about.
Alan Grayson
U.S. Representative D-Florida, Foreign Affairs Committee member
CSPAN 08/01/2013
..Defense Department is supposed to defend us from foreign enemies. Domestically, we rely upon the FBI and the department justice. Notwithstanding, for the past few years, the NSA has gone wild and conducted domestic surveillance on literally every single American, all 320 million people who have a telephone. That is wrong and unconstitutional. Our founding fathers were quite clear on this point. The NSA has made a mockery of that.
Alan Grayson
U.S. Representative D-Florida, Foreign Affairs Committee member
CSPAN 08/01/2013
There was a shocking report a few years ago that the NSA was actually listening to phone calls of a very personal nature between deployed servicemen overseas and their wives. Phone sex actually. And NSA agents were literally passing around the tapes of phone sex calls that had been made by servicemen to their wives. Apparently, none of the NSA agents who were conducting that
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